Google Scholar


Google Scholar

Google Scholar

Jeff Coghill MLIS HSL - Outreach Librarian - Director, Eastern AHEC Library Services - Laupus Library - East Carolina University - Summary - Google Scholar is an adjunct to the popular Google search engine. Google Scholar's objective is to tease out content. - Content - Google Scholar tries to find catalogue and all literature the deluge of content. The audience includes professors, researchers, health care professionalsanyone together with the need to peruse the literature and is. Citations at Google Scholar are presented at a simple manner with the title of the article as the first component, followed closely from the author, publication, date, relevant links, a concise overview and the capacity to utilize web performance to categorize citations for private or later usage.

The default search yields citations in relevance or order. Another choice is to separate citations in a form. Contained are choices to search by citation, by patents, and by date. Alternatives under Settings include hunting by case law, altering the default 10 citations per webpage to 20 links to citations styles including BibTex, per page, EndNote, RefMan, and RefWorks. Most important world languages are available for citations. A spectacular feature is the capability to select preferred libraries, like a home library, which will display next to citations found at Google Scholar. By logging in with a Gmail account, users might elect to save settings and create private lists of citations for future reference.

Lastly, a Scholar Button can be added into your browser for quick, one button access to Google Scholar. Features\/Functionality - A search of Google Scholar yields near instantaneous results. The results can be at the thousands or millions. Nevertheless, if users select form from date, the same search changes significantly. Therein lies a big disadvantage for Google Scholar. For instance, a search for atrial fibrillation gives 1, 030, 000 results in the sort by value option. Change into a form from date and the results list drops to 10, 500 citations.

Why? For researchers, especially librarians who work on systematic reviews, this is frustrating. In addition, from the default setting, the date sequence display of citations is completely randomwith no rhyme or reason. In addition, placing quotation marks around the search term drops the results list from 1M+ to 965, 000 results.

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